All about the Golden Honey

Bees swallow, digest and regurgitate nectar to make honey; this nectar contains almost 600 compounds. We need our bees, so let’s do everything we can to save them and keep them here on this earth. Honey can be officially one of the powerfoods, because it’s endless list of health benefits. It is one of the oldest sweeteners on eart and should get credit for that

Great article about Bee extinction here.

Reduce Cough and Throat Irritation

Increase Athletic Performance

Ancient Olympic athletes would eat honey and dried figs to enhance their performance. This has now been verified with modern studies, showing that it is superior in maintaining glycogen levels and improving recovery time than other sweeteners.

Prevent Cancer

Honey contains flavonoids, antioxidants which help reduce the risk of some cancers and heart disease.

Healing Wounds and Burns

Treating Allergies

One placebo-controlled study which included 36 people with ocular allergies, found that participants responded better to treatment with honey compared to placebo.

Fighting Infections

Manuka Honey kills bacteria by destroying key bacterial proteins. Honey’s ability to kill bacteria lies in a protein called defensin-1. Manuka Honey is affective at treating chronic wound infections. Natural honey is better at killing bacteria than artificial honey.

Honey Improves Your Scalp

Honey diluted with a bit of warm water was shown to significantly improve seborrheic dermatitis, which is a scalp condition that causes dandruff and itching. After applying the solution every other day for four weeks, “all of the patients responded markedly.”

Boost Your Energy

A healthy, whole-food diet and proper sleep is the best recipe for boundless energy, but if you’re looking for a quick energy boost, such as before or after a workout, honey can suffice. This is particularly true for athletes looking for a “time-released fuel” to provide energy over a longer duration.

Remedy For Herpes Sores

Boost Memory

The sweet nectar is loaded in antioxidants that may help prevent cellular damage and loss within the brain. A 2011 study published in Menopause found a daily spoonful of Malaysian honey may boost postmenopausal women’s memory, which can provide an alternative therapy for the hormone-related intellectual decline. After four months of taking 20 grams of honey a day, the women were more likely to have better short-term memory than their counterparts who took hormone pills. Honey’s ability to help the body absorb calcium, according to Brennecke, helps aid brain health. The brain needs calcium in order to process thought and make decisions.

Sleep Aid

Honey can be a health aid for sleepless nights. Similar to sugar, honey can cause a rise in insulin and release serotonin — a neurotransmitter that improves mood and happiness. “The body converts serotonin into melatonin, a chemical compound that regulates the length and the quality of sleep,” Rene Ficek, registered dietitian and lead dietitian nutritionist at Seattle Sutton’s Healthy Eating in Chicago, Ill.


History of Honey

  • Over four thousand years ago, honey was used as a traditional ayurvedic medicine, where it was thought to be effective at treating material imbalances in the body.
  • In pre-Ancient Egyptian times, honey was used topically to treat wounds.1.
  • Egyptian medicinal compounds more than five millennia ago used honey.
  • The ancient Greeks believed that consuming honey could help you live longer.
  • Even the Prophet Mohammed glorified the healing powers of honey.
  • The Quran also praises honey’s healing ability: “And thy Lord taught the Bee to build its cells in hills, on trees, and in (men’s) habitations; Then to eat of all the produce (of the earth), and find with skill the spacious paths of its Lord: there issues from within their bodies a drink of varying colors, wherein is healing for men: verily in this is a Sign for those who give thought.”

Below is a typical honey profile, according to BeeSource:

  • Fructose: 38.2%
  • Glucose: 31.3%
  • Maltose: 7.1%
  • Sucrose: 1.3%
  • Water: 17.2%
  • Higher sugars: 1.5%
  • Ash: 0.2%
  • Other/undetermined: 3.2%

 

The slightly acidic pH level of honey (between 3.2 and 4.5) is what helps prevent the growth of bacteria, while its antioxidant constituents cleans up free radicals. The physical properties of honey vary depending on the specific flora that was used to produce it, as well as its water content.

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